Lead pollution beat explorers to South Pole

21 August 2014

Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen became the first man to reach the South Pole in December 1911. More than 100 years later, an international team of scientists has proved that air pollution from industrial activities arrived at the South Pole long before any human.

Using data from 16 ice cores collected from widely spaced locations around the Antarctic continent, including the South Pole, a group led by Joe McConnell of the Desert Research Institute...

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Compact genome of the world's coldest insect

21 August 2014

Antarctica's cold, desert environment is inhospitable to most forms of terrestrial life. Although the surrounding ocean nurtures an abundance of marine life, and offshore islands offer summer breeding grounds for birds and seals, few animals are found year-round in Antarctica’s terrestrial habitat. Insects, the dominant life form on most continents, are represented by a single endemic Antarctic species, a wingless midge, Belgica antarctica. In its...

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Six priorities for Antarctic science

7 August 2014

The official outcomes of the 1st SCAR Antarctic and Southern Ocean Science Horizon Scan were published online today as a Comment in Nature (512, 23–25; 2014) entitled “Six priorities for Antarctic science”.

In April 2014, SCAR convened 75 scientists and policy-makers from 22 countries to agree on the priorities for Antarctic...

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Oldest fossil mammals from Antarctica found on Seymour Island

6 August 2014

New fossil mammals found at the base of Acantilados II Allomember of the La Meseta Formation, from the early Eocene (Ypresian) of Seymour Island, represent the oldest evidence of this group in Antarctica.

In a study published in the journal Palaeontology, the authors described two specimens. The first belongs to a talonid portion of a lower right molar assigned to the sparnotheriodontid litoptern Notiolofos sp. cf. N. arquinotiensis....

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2014 SCAR Medal awardees announced

During the SCAR Open Science Conference in Auckland, NZ, two SCAR medals will be awarded. The first, the SCAR Medal for Excellence in Antarctic Research will go to Steven Chown for his extensive contributions to Antarctic Science and policy and to SCAR; and the second, the SCAR Medal for International Scientific Coordination, will be awarded jointly to Mahlon “Chuck” Kennicutt and Rasik Ravindra for their collaborative and...

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Error discovered in Antarctic sea-ice record

24 July 2014

Rising temperatures have caused the amount of Arctic sea ice to shrink dramatically since global observations began in the 1970s. But on the other side of the world, sea ice in Antarctica was at first steady — and then began to slowly expand in the mid-2000s.

Some researchers now say that the Antarctic trend may have been inflated by an error in the decades-long record of satellite observations of Southern Hemisphere sea ice. Scientists process data...

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Tim Naish awarded 2014 Muse Prize

14 July 2014

Professor Tim Naish has been awarded the 2014 Muse Prize, for his outstanding research in understanding Antarctica’s response to past and present climate change and the role of Antarctica’s ice sheets in global sea-level change through time.  He led the first season of the ambitious and highly successful Antarctic Drilling Program (ANDRILL) where his international team pioneered...

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Volcanic history of the Antarctic helps with future climate models

10 July 2014

An international study of ice cores has helped researchers pave the way for a better understanding of how Antarctica’s volcanoes have affected the global climate over the past 2,000 years. 

The research, published in the journal Nature, has “filled in” the record of Antarctica’s historic volcanic sulphuric emissions.  Led by Michael Sigl and Joe McConnell of Nevada’s Desert...

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Toddler penguins buddy up for survival

2 July 2014

Traveling with a pal is often more fun than going solo. And it may just help baby king penguins live to adulthood.

Soon after chicks are born, their parents leave them for weeks at a time to go fishing. With the adults away, the furry young king penguins huddle in groups called crèches to keep warm and discourage predators. Hanging out in one spot helps returning parents find their young in a colony of up to 500,000 individuals spread over several...

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Scientists announce discovery of tiny new animal in Antarctica's Victoria Land

2 July 2014

Scientists have discovered a new member of the tardigrade family. Also known as water bears or moss piglets, these are widespread and ancient microscopic animals, around half a millimetre long at most and generally found in moss and lichen, where they eat plant cells or small invertebrates.

Members of the group are found everywhere from high mountains and hot deserts to the deep ocean. Their success stems partly from the fact they're among the...

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Antarctica's protected areas are inadequate, unrepresentative, and at risk

2 July 2014

Antarctica is widely regarded as one of the planet's last true wildernesses, insulated from threat by its remoteness and declaration as a natural reserve dedicated to peace and science. However, rapidly growing human activity is accelerating threats to biodiversity.

The authors in a new article in PLOS Biology (including the current and incoming Chief Officers of SCAR's Standing Committee on the Antarctic Treaty System) determined how well...

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Antarctic species dwindle as icebergs batter shores year-round

2 July 2014

The Antarctic shore is a place of huge contrasts, as quiet, dark and frozen winters give way to bright, clear waters, thick with algae and peppered with drifting icebergs in summer. But as the planet has warmed in the last two decades, losses of sea ice in winter have left icebergs free to roam for most of the year. As a result, say researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on June 16, boulders on the shallow seabed - once...

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Whales sustain fisheries: Blue whales stimulate primary production in the Southern Ocean

2 July 2014

It has previously been asserted that baleen whales compete with fisheries by consuming potentially harvestable marine resources. The regularly applied "surplus-yield model" suggests that whale prey becomes available to fisheries if whales are removed, and has been presented as a justification for whaling. However, recent findings indicate that whales enhance ecosystem productivity by defecating iron that stimulates primary productivity in iron-limited...

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Antarctic Ice Sheet unstable at end of last Ice Age

12 June 2014

A new study, published in the journal Nature, has found that the Antarctic Ice Sheet began melting about 5,000 years earlier than previously thought coming out of the last ice age – and that shrinkage of the vast ice sheet accelerated during eight distinct episodes, causing rapid sea level rise.

The international study is particularly important coming on the heels of recent studies that suggest destabilization of part of the West...

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Major West Antarctic glacier melting from geothermal source

12 June 2014

Thwaites Glacier, the large, rapidly changing outlet of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, is not only being eroded by the ocean, it's being melted from below by geothermal heat, researchers at the Institute for Geophysics at The University of Texas at Austin (UTIG) report in the current edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The findings significantly change the understanding of conditions beneath the West Antarctic...

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Antarctic ice sheet less stable than assumed, researchers say

29 May 2014

A massive melt from the Antarctic ice sheet 14,600 years helped increase global sea levels by four metres per century, according to a new study.

The findings, reported in the journal Nature, shows how closely linked ocean dynamics and ice sheet melting are, which should help scientists currently modelling future sea level increases. Since...

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Nominations invited for IASC Medal Award 2015

29 May 2014

IASC Medals are awarded in recognition of exceptional and sustained contributions to the understanding of the Arctic. A maximum of one award is made each year, assuming that there is a nominee of appropriate quality. The award of medals is normally by the President of IASC during the Arctic Science Summit Week (or exceptionally at another major international meeting) following the ratification of the award.

Nominations for the IASC Medal 2015 can...

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ESA's Cryosat mission sees Antarctic ice losses double

22 May 2014

Antarctica is now losing about 160 billion tonnes of ice a year to the ocean - twice as much as when the continent was last surveyed.

The new assessment comes from Europe's Cryosat spacecraft, which has a radar instrument specifically designed to measure the shape of the ice sheet. The melt loss from the White Continent is sufficient to push up global sea levels by around 0.43mm per year. Scientists report the data in the journal - read more

New chairs of the Southern Ocean Observing System

13 May 2014

SCAR and SCOR are pleased to announce the new members of the Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS) Executive Committee: Anna Wahlin takes over from Mike Meredith as the Physical Sciences Co-Chair and joins Oscar Schofield, the Biological Sciences Co-Chair, in leading the Scientific Committee. There are also two new positions in the Executive Committee: Sebastiaan Swart is the Physical Sciences Vice Chair,...

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Key glaciers in West Antarctica are in an irreversible retreat

13 May 2014

Key glaciers in West Antarctica are in an irreversible retreat, a study team led by the US space agency (NASA) says. It analysed 40 years of observations of six big ice streams draining into the Amundsen Bay and concluded that nothing now can stop them melting away.

Although these are abrupt changes, the timescales involved are likely measured in centuries, the researchers add. If the glaciers really do disappear, they would add roughly 1.2m to...

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Scientists tracking massive iceberg which broke off Pine Island Glacier

30 April 2014

Scientists are monitoring an iceberg roughly six times the size of Manhattan - one of the largest now in existence - that broke off from an Antarctic glacier and is heading into the open ocean.

NASA glaciologist Kelly Brunt said on Wednesday the iceberg covers about 255 square miles (660 square km) and is up to a third of a mile (500 meters) thick. Known as B31, the iceberg separated from Antarctica's Pine Island Glacier last November, Brunt...

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Antarctic scientists work on 20-year goals

23 April 2014

Antarctica has been the focus of a major conference in Queenstown over Easter. Dozens of scientists came together, and for once they were not after answers, but questions. The world's best Antarctic scientists say we cannot ignore the icy continent.

"As we always say, what happens in Antarctica actually has global implications," says American oceanographer Chuck Kennicutt.

Fifty-five scientists from 24 countries have convened in...

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Interview: Chuck Kennicutt and Gary Wilson

23 April 2014

Just prior to the start of the Horizon Scan Retreat in Queenstown, New Zealand, Lisa Owen of 3 News talks to US oceanographer Chuck Kennicutt and Professor Gary Wilson of NZARI about how climate change is affecting Antarctica and the impact that's having on New Zealand.

To watch the video interview and read the transcript, see the - read more

Exotic space particles slam into buried South Pole detector

16 April 2014

IceCube detected three neutrinos that could have radiated from titanic explosions in the depths of space.

A belowground experiment at the South Pole has now discovered three of the highest-energy neutrinos ever found, particles that may be created in the most violent explosions of the universe. These neutrinos all have energies at the absurdly high scale of petaelectronvolts — roughly the energy equivalent of one million times a proton's mass....

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IASC appoints new Executive Committee and welcomes Austria as a new member country

10 April 2014

On 8 April, at its meeting during the Arctic Science Summit Week 2014 in Helsinki, IASC Council elected a new President and three Vice-Presidents. The new IASC President is Susan Barr, Norwegian Directorate for Cultural Heritage. Susan Barr has been working on the IASC Executive Committee as a Vice-President since 2010 and she is now taking over the Presidency from David Hik, whose 4-year term came to an end. David Hik will, however, continue to work...

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The NZ IceFest website is now live!

 

NZ IceFest flyer

9 April 2014

New Zealand IceFest is coming – mark your calendar for 26 September to 12 October 2014, to celebrate all things Antarctic. Check out the website to see a sneak preview of what is on offer.

NZ IceFest website

 

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Southern Ocean satellite data survey

9 April 2014

What are your requirements for Southern Ocean satellite data? Are your data needs being met? Take this quick online survey now!

This joint initiative of Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS), Climate and the Cryosphere (CliC),...

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New study shows major increase in West Antarctic glacial loss

27 March 2014:

Six massive glaciers in West Antarctica are moving faster than they did 40 years ago, causing more ice to discharge into the ocean and global sea level to rise, according to new research.

The amount of ice draining collectively from those half-dozen glaciers increased by 77 percent from 1973 to 2013, scientists report this month in Geophysical Research Letters. Pine Island Glacier, the most active of the studied glaciers, has...

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Iron fertilization of the Subantarctic Ocean during the last ice age

 

24 March 2014:

John H. Martin, who discovered widespread iron limitation of ocean productivity, proposed that dust-borne iron fertilization of Southern Ocean phytoplankton caused the ice age reduction in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). In a sediment core from the Subantarctic Atlantic, Martínez-García et al. (2014), measured foraminifera-bound nitrogen isotopes to reconstruct ice age nitrate consumption, burial fluxes of iron, and proxies for...

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"What will Antarctica and the Southern Ocean look like in 2065?"

 

24 March 2014:

The 1st Martha T. Muse Fellows Colloquium; 22 April 2014; Queenstown, New Zealand

Many forecasters and futurists tell us that in 2065:

  • the world's human population will be 8.5 billion,
  • atmospheric CO2 levels will exceed 650 ppm under a business as usual scenario,
  • the Arctic ocean will be ice free in August and September,
  • average global temperature will 4°C warmer than in...

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Surface-water iron supplies in the Southern Ocean sustained by deep winter mixing

20 March 2014:

Low levels of iron limit primary productivity across much of the Southern Ocean. At the basin scale, most dissolved iron is supplied to surface waters from subsurface reservoirs, because land inputs are spatially limited. Deep mixing in winter together with year-round diffusion across density surfaces, known as diapycnal diffusion, are the main physical processes that carry iron-laden subsurface waters to the surface.

In a recent paper in...

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Moss brought back to life after 1,500 years frozen in ice

20 March 2014:

Researchers from the UK have demonstrated that, after over 1,500 years frozen in Antarctic ice, moss can come back to life and continue to grow. For the first time, this vital part of the ecosystem in both polar regions has been shown to have the ability to survive century to millennial scale ice ages. This provides exciting new insight into the survival of life on Earth.

The team, reporting in Current Biology this week, observed moss...

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Cosmic inflation: 'Spectacular' discovery hailed from South Pole Telescope facility

20 March 2014:

Researchers believe they have found the signal left in the sky by the super-rapid expansion of space that must have occurred just fractions of a second after everything came into being. The measurements were taken using the BICEP2 instrument at the South Pole Telescope facility. It takes the form of a distinctive twist in the oldest light detectable with telescopes.

The work will be scrutinised carefully, but already there is talk of a...

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Obituary: Martha T Muse

19 March 2014:

SCAR and the Selection Committee for the Martha T Muse Prize for Antarctic Science and Policy join the Tinker Foundation in mourning the passing of Martha T Muse on 9th February 2014. Martha was a founding director of the Tinker Foundation. She served as its president for 27 years and its chairman for 33 years, retiring in 2008. It was under her direction that the Foundation became a leading funder of Latin American-related activities, providing support...

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Volcanoes helped life survive ice ages

12 March 2014:

An international collaboration has found new evidence that the steam and heat from volcanoes and heated rocks may have allowed plants and animals to survive periods in the past when much of the landscape was covered by ice. The authors of the study include one former and two current SCAR Chief Officers: Pete Convey, CO of the former programme EBA (Evolution and Biodiversity in Antarctica), Steven Chown, CO of SCATS (Standing Committee on the Antarctic...

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Antarctic sea ice explained

12 March 2014:

The ACE CRC (Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre) has launched Position Analysis: Antarctic Sea Ice and Climate Change 2014. This 44-page publication has been produced by Dr Jan Lieser and other sea ice scientists at the ACE CRC, the Australian Antarctic Division and the - read more

Obituary: Dr Philip M. Smith

6 March 2014:

The Polar world and SCAR have lost a great friend. Phil Smith, known to SCAR members as the leader of the review that led to major restructuring of SCAR in the early 2000s, passed on February 16, 2014.

Phil began his involvement in the Polar Regions when, as a young US Army Lieutenant, he was sent to Greenland as a navigator for the heavy tractor "swings" then traversing the Greenland Ice Sheet. Phil was trained by Major Palle Mogenson and...

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Climate change to affect Antarctic predator-prey relationships

 

5 March 2014:

According to a new study published in Geophysical Research Letters, the Ross Sea, a major, biologically productive Antarctic ecosystem, "clearly will be extensively modified by future climate change" in the coming decades as rising temperatures and changing wind patterns create longer periods of ice-free open water, affecting the life cycles...

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Cessation of deep convection in the open Southern Ocean under anthropogenic climate change

5 March 2014:

In 1974, newly available satellite observations unveiled the presence of a giant ice-free area, or polynya, within the Antarctic ice pack of the Weddell Sea, which persisted during the two following winters. Subsequent research showed that deep convective overturning had opened a conduit between the surface and the abyssal ocean, and had maintained the polynya through the massive release of heat from the deep sea. Although the polynya has aroused continued...

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Korea's 20th International Symposium on Polar Sciences

24 February 2014:

We are pleased to announce that Korea Polar Research Institute will hold the 20th International Symposium on Polar Sciences in Songdo, Incheon, Republic of Korea on May 27-29, 2014.

KOPRI's International Symposium on Polar Sciences, born with the launch of Korea's Antarctic research programme, provided opportunities to stay abreast of the current trends in polar research, and to plan for future efforts among international colleagues....

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Previous rapid thinning of Pine Island Glacier sheds light on future Antarctic ice loss

24 February 2014:

New research, published this week in Science, suggests that the largest single contributor to global sea level rise, a glacier of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, may continue thinning for decades to come.

Geologists from the UK, USA and Germany found that Pine Island Glacier (PIG), which is rapidly accelerating, thinning and retreating, has thinned rapidly before. The team say their findings demonstrate the potential for current ice loss to...

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Scientists count whales from space

19 February 2014:

Scientists have demonstrated a new method for counting whales from space. It uses very high-resolution satellite pictures and image-processing software to automatically detect the great mammals at or near the ocean surface.

A test count, reported in the journal PLOS One was conducted on southern right whales in the Golfo Nuevo on the...

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New IceBridge MCoRDS L2 Ice Thickness data

19 February 2014:

The IceBridge MCoRDS L2 Ice Thickness (IRMCR2) data set contains depth sounder measurements over Greenland and Antarctica taken from the Multichannel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder (MCoRDS). The data set includes measurements for elevation, surface, bottom, and thickness. The data were collected as part of Operation IceBridge funded campaigns, and are stored in Comma...

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Launch of 2014 SCAR and COMNAP Fellowships and CCAMLR Scholarships

12 February 2014:

Three leading Antarctic organisations today announce opportunities for early career researchers. The Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR), the Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programmes (COMNAP) and the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) are working together to...

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Any questions? Crowdsourcing research priorities for greater impact

6 February 2014:

Future Earth recently published an article on how scientists increasingly design their research questions through a grassroots process.

They suggest that good research is as much about framing good questions as ferreting out answers. But if the answers are meant to be applied, what counts as a good question is not always easy to agree. Academics, practitioners, and...

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New volumes on Antarctic Earth Sciences published

5 February 2014:

Under an agreement with SCAR, two new volumes on Antarctic Earth Sciences have been published by the Geological Society, resulting from the 11th SCAR International Symposium on Antarctic Earth Sciences (ISAES XI) held in Edinburgh in 2011. The volumes are entitled: "Antarctic Palaeoenvironments and Earth-Surface Processes" and "Antarctica and Supercontinent Evolution"...

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New Antarctic map decades in the making

5 February 2014:

Detailed geological map of Southern Victoria Land at 1:250,000A new geological map of southern Victoria Land in Antarctica shows the area in more detail than ever before.

Covering 84,600sq km, including the largest ice-free area of Antarctica, it replaces a 1962 map generated by New Zealand geologists Bernie Gunn and Guyon Warren. It features the area...

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InBev-Baillet Latour Fellowship

5 February 2014:

Since 2008, the €150,000 InBev-Baillet Latour Antarctica Fellowship has provided young scientists with the opportunity to conduct research in East Antarctica operating out of the Princess Elisabeth Antarctica research station.

The call for proposals for the 2014 - 2016 InBev-Baillet Latour Antarctica Fellowship is now open!

Young researchers interested in conducting research in the atmospheric sciences, glaciology, geology and...

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Disappearing snow increases risk of collapsing ice shelves in Antarctica

30 January 2014:

A number of floating ice shelves in Antarctica are at risk of disappearing entirely in the next 200 years, as global warming reduces their snow cover. Their collapse would enhance the discharge of ice into the oceans and increase the rate at which sea-level rises. A rapid reduction of greenhouse gas emissions could save a number of these ice shelves, researchers at Utrecht University and the British Antarctic Survey say in a new paper published in the...

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SCAR's new Past Antarctic Ice Sheet Dynamics (PAIS) research programme

29 January 2014:

The Implementation Plan for SCAR's new Scientific Research Programme, Past Antarctic Ice Sheet Dynamics (PAIS), is now available.

PAIS aims to improve our understanding of ice sheet dynamics during past warm world conditions by:

  • targeting the study of vulnerable areas around the continent (both on the West and East Antarctic...

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Antarctic Science Communication Award - SCAR OSC 2014

28 January 2014:

SCAR is seeking new and innovative ways to communicate Antarctic science to everyone (scientists, managers, the public) with greater impact.

At the SCAR OSC 2014, there will be a science session (#48) at which a valuable prize will be awarded for the most innovative presentation of Antarctic research results in any discipline. This is the first such award given at SCAR OSC, and is a follow-on...

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Nominations open for 2014 Muse Prize

27 January 2014:

Nominations are now open for the 2014 Muse Prize.

The "Martha T. Muse Prize for Science and Policy in Antarctica" is a US$ 100,000 unrestricted award presented to an individual in the fields of Antarctic science or policy who has demonstrated potential for sustained and significant contributions that will enhance the understanding and/or preservation of Antarctica. The Prize is inspired by...

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XII International Symposium on Antarctic Earth Sciences (ISAES) 2015

23 January 2014:

The 12th International Symposium on Antarctic Earth Sciences (ISAES) will take place from 13-17 July 2015 in Goa, India.

ISAES is a SCAR-initiative aimed at showcasing Antarctic geoscience research, taking stock of the accomplishments of the International community and providing guidance for future studies. The first ISAES was organised back in 1963 in Cape Town, and the last one (11th) at Edinburgh, with the Symposium traversing through Oslo,...

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Atlantic warming melts Antarctic ice

23 January 2014:

Several glaciers in the Antarctic Peninsula pass between sharp mountain peaks and converge in a single calving front, as seen by Operation IceBridge while returning from a survey of the Ronne Ice Shelf on 1 November 2012. NASA's Operation IceBridge is an airborne science mission to study Earth's polar ice.

Though physically about as distant from Antarctica as you can get, water masses in the North and Tropical Atlantic Ocean significantly influence...

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Antarctic Science International Bursary Call for Proposals

23 January 2014:

The Antarctic Science International Bursaries are awards of up to £5000, made annually to support the development of the careers of promising young scientists, working in any field of Antarctic science. The purpose of the award is to broaden the scope of an existing research project, especially for postdoctoral studies, through:

  1. funding extra field or laboratory work,
  2. purchasing/contributing towards the cost of a...

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Papers invited for "The current status on the ecosystem of Antarctic Peninsula"

20 January 2014:

Papers are invited for a forthcoming special issue of the journal Advances in Polar Science (APS), entitled "The current status on the ecosystem of Antarctic Peninsula".

The issue will provide a forum summarizing the recent advances on expeditions and research based or focused on the ecosystems of the Antarctic Peninsula. Scientific articles stressing the following research themes may fit well within the scope of this special...

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Future Earth Engagement Committee - call published on the ICSU website

14 January 2014:

The call for the Future Earth Engagement Committee has just been published.

Future Earth is a 10-year international research programme that will provide critical knowledge required for societies to face the challenges posed by global environmental change and to identify opportunities for transformations towards global...

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SCAR's new State of the Antarctic Ecosystem (AntEco) research programme

14 January 2014:

The Implementation Plan for SCAR's new Scientific Research Programme, State of the Antarctic Ecosystem (AntEco), is now available.

Biological diversity is the sum of all those organisms that are present in an ecosystem, that dictate how ecosystems function, and that underpin the life-support system of our planet. This programme has been designed to focus...

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Call for nominations for SOOS Steering Committee

13 January 2014:

Nominations are open for new members to join the SOOS Scientific Steering Committee (SSC).

We are keen to ensure broad national coverage on the SSC. Nominations of experts from all disciplines will be considered; however we are particularly interested in nominations from experts in:
• Ocean/ice-sheet dynamics
• Technologists (e.g., hardware,...

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Pine Island Glacier retreat may be irreversible

13 January 2014:

Pine Island Glacier, the largest single contributor to sea-level rise in Antarctica, has started shrinking, say scientists.

The work, published in Nature Climate Change, shows the glacier's retreat may have begun an irreversible process that could see the amount of water it is adding to the ocean increase five-fold.

'At the Pine Island Glacier we have seen that not only is more ice flowing from the glacier into the ocean, but it's...

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Estimates of Southern Ocean circulation improved by animal-borne instruments

13 January 2014:

Over the last decade, several hundred seals have been equipped with conductivity-temperature-depth sensors in the Southern Ocean for both biological and physical oceanographic studies.

A calibrated collection of seal-derived hydrographic data is now available, consisting of more than 165,000 profiles. The value of these hydrographic data within the existing Southern Ocean observing system is demonstrated herein by conducting two state estimation...

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Pine Island Glacier sensitive to climatic variability

7 January 2014:

A new study published in Science suggests the thinning of Pine Island Glacier in West Antarctica is much more susceptible to climatic and ocean variability than at first thought.

Observations by a team of scientists at British Antarctic Survey, and other institutions, show large fluctuations in the ocean heat in Pine Island Bay. The team discovered that oceanic melting of the ice shelf into which the glacier flows decreased by 50 per cent...

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100 year-old negatives found frozen in Antarctic ice

7 January 2014:

Conservators restoring an Antarctic exploration hut recently made a remarkable discovery. A small box, frozen in a solid block of ice for nearly one hundred years, turned out to be a treasure trove containing 22 unprocessed cellulose nitrate negatives. They're believed to have been snapped by the Ross Sea Party way back in 1915, while they attempted to set up supply depots on the New Zealand side of Antarctica.

The newly discovered negatives were...

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Ice-loving sea anemones found in Antarctica

7 January 2014:

A species of sea anemone has been found on the underside of Antarctica's ice sheets. They are the only marine animals known to live embedded in the ice, and no one is sure how they survive.

Frank Rack of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and colleagues made the surprise find when they drilled through the ice for a geological study. They were using a camera attached to a remote-controlled drill to explore the underside of the Ross Ice Shelf when...

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